News

A Visit From Good Day

Dina from Good Day Sacramento visits us to find out how you can help local wildlife. Plus, a peek at one of our current residences, a Red-Tailed Hawk.
1 week ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the day: Mexican Free-tailed Bat

Bats are the primary carriers of rabies in California so you should always wear thick leather gloves if you NEED to handle them. As you can see from the pictures, their teeth are really small so you may not even realize that you have been bitten which is why you need to take the proper precautions with them.

Bat appreciation: bats pollinate about 500 species of plants, in clear-cut areas they pollinate about 95% of seeds for new growth, they are the only pollinators of agave (used to make Tequila). On average, bats can eat 1,000 to 1,200 mosquitoes in an hour!!

This bat has a fractured wing so it will go to NorCal Bats where they will treat the injury!😁

1 week ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the day: Coyote!
This coyote was found in Vacaville and all of its paws were burned from the Vacaville fire (seen in picture 2). Fortunately, the burns don't seem too bad so we are hopeful that it will pull through!

1 week ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the day: Virginia opossum
Baby opossums are beyond adorable💕
This baby had an injury on its tail but it will heal soon enough and this baby will be on its way to be released!

2 weeks ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Happy #nationalwildlifeday !!! One of our favorite days to celebrate. So far, we’ve received over 5,600 animals.
This job is very rewarding and we are so lucky to have such a huge number of supporters.
Always remember to appreciate wildlife when you see it - every species is an integral part of our ecosystem!
#wildlife #rehab #nationalwildlifeday #conservation

2 weeks ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the Day: Wilson's Warbler
This bird is often spotted in the wild but it is not a very common patient at WCA.
In the last 5 years we have only treated 14 of them

2 weeks ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the day: Black-headed Grosbeak
This is another rare bird at WCA. This is only the 3rd one we have received this year.

This bird was most likely caught by cat and as you can see from the pictures it has quite a few wounds from the attack. However, we are hopeful that it will make a full recovery!😁

2 weeks ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the day: Common Murre
This is a very rare patient at WCA

Fun fact: Common Murres are a monogamous species which means they are loyal to their mate. Both parents participate in taking care of the egg and the chick when it hatches. When chicks fledge they will go out to sea with their dad who teaches them how to eat and how to fly.

2 weeks ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the day: Black-tailed Jackrabbits

Fun fact: Jackrabbits are a precocial species which means they mature quickly and require little maternal care. Whereas Cottontail rabbits (posted yesterday) are an altricial species which means they will take longer to mature and need mom around for a longer period of time.

2 weeks ago
Photos from Wildlife Care Association of Sacramento's post

Patient of the day: Desert Cottontail
Fun fact: in the 3rd picture, you can see a white spot on this bunnys belly which is actually milk. This means that this baby's mom fed it right before it was brought to us. When you find a baby bunny always check for this milk spot to know if mom is still around.

3 weeks ago

Patient of the day: Swainson’s Hawk

This hawk came in as a fledgling and was overheated so it didn’t have the strength to fly. Once we got it stable, it started eating on its own. Then it went into pre-release caging to gain the strength to finally be released!

Fun fact: Swainson’s Hawks are also known as Locust or Grasshopper hawks because they prefer to eat those bugs! Their migratory pattern also reflects where they will typically find these insects. When those insects aren’t in abundance, they will eat small rodents.

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